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Important Tax Information for 2020

January, 2020

Courtesy of our Partners at TaxRite.

For the past several years, we've dedicated a January blog post to share important tax information for the new year with you. From standard deductions to health savings accounts and tax rate schedules, here's a checklist of tax changes to help you plan the year ahead.

Individuals

In 2020, a number of tax provisions are affected by inflation adjustments, including Health Savings Accounts, retirement contribution limits, and the foreign earned income exclusion. The tax rate structure, which ranges from 10 to 37 percent, remains similar to 2019; however, the tax-bracket thresholds increase for each filing status. Standard deductions also rise, and as a reminder, personal exemptions have been eliminated through tax year 2025.

Standard Deduction

In 2020, the standard deduction increases to $12,400 for individuals (up from $12,200 in 2019) and to $24,800 for married couples (up from $24,400 in 2019).

Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

In 2020, AMT exemption amounts increase to $72,900 for individuals (up from $71,700 in 2019) and $113,400 for married couples filing jointly (up from $111,700 in 2019). Also, the phaseout threshold increases to $518,400 ($1,036,800 for married filing jointly). Both the exemption and threshold amounts are indexed annually for inflation.

"Kiddie Tax"

For taxable years beginning in 2020, the amount that can be used to reduce the net unearned income reported on the child's return that is subject to the "kiddie tax," is $1,100. The same $1,100 amount is used to determine whether a parent may elect to include a child's gross income in the parent's gross income and to calculate the "kiddie tax." For example, one of the requirements for the parental election is that a child's gross income for 2020 must be more than $1,100 but less than $11,000.

Health Savings Accounts (HSAs)

Contributions to a Health Savings Account (HSA) are used to pay current or future medical expenses of the account owner, his or her spouse, and any qualified dependent. Medical expenses must not be reimbursable by insurance or other sources and do not qualify for the medical expense deduction on a federal income tax return.

A qualified individual must be covered by a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) and not be covered by other health insurance with the exception of insurance for accidents, disability, dental care, vision care, or long-term care.

For calendar year 2020, a qualifying HDHP must have a deductible of at least $1,400 for self-only coverage or $2,800 for family coverage and must limit annual out-of-pocket expenses of the beneficiary to $6,900 for self-only coverage and $13,800 for family coverage.

Medical Savings Accounts (MSAs)

There are two types of Medical Savings Accounts (MSAs): the Archer MSA created to help self-employed individuals and employees of certain small employers, and the Medicare Advantage MSA, which is also an Archer MSA, and is designated by Medicare to be used solely to pay the qualified medical expenses of the account holder. To be eligible for a Medicare Advantage MSA, you must be enrolled in Medicare. Both MSAs require that you are enrolled in a high-deductible health plan (HDHP).

  • Self-only coverage. For taxable years beginning in 2020, the term "high deductible health plan" means, for self-only coverage, a health plan that has an annual deductible that is not less than $2,350 (same as 2019) and not more than $3,550 (up $50 from 2019), and under which the annual out-of-pocket expenses required to be paid (other than for premiums) for covered benefits do not exceed $4,750 (up $100 from 2019).
  • Family coverage. For taxable years beginning in 2020, the term "high deductible health plan" means, for family coverage, a health plan that has an annual deductible that is not less than $4,750 and not more than $7,100, and under which the annual out-of-pocket expenses required to be paid (other than for premiums) for covered benefits do not exceed $8,650.

AGI Limit for Deductible Medical Expenses

In 2020, the deduction threshold for deductible medical expenses is 7.5 percent of adjusted gross income (AGI).

Eligible Long-Term Care Premiums

Premiums for long-term care are treated the same as health care premiums and are deductible on your taxes subject to certain limitations. For individuals age 40 or younger at the end of 2020, the limitation is $430. Persons more than 40 but not more than 50 can deduct $810. Those more than 50 but not more than 60 can deduct $1,630 while individuals more than 60 but not more than 70 can deduct $4,350. The maximum deduction is $5,430 and applies to anyone more than 70 years of age.

Medicare Taxes

The additional 0.9 percent Medicare tax on wages above $200,000 for individuals ($250,000 married filing jointly) remains in effect for 2020, as does the Medicare tax of 3.8 percent on investment (unearned) income for single taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income (AGI) more than $200,000 ($250,000 joint filers). Investment income includes dividends, interest, rents, royalties, gains from the disposition of property, and certain passive activity income. Estates, trusts, and self-employed individuals are all liable for the tax.

Foreign Earned Income Exclusion

For 2020, the foreign earned income exclusion amount is $107,600 up from $105,900 in 2019.

Long-Term Capital Gains and Dividends

In 2020 tax rates on capital gains and dividends remain the same as 2019 rates (0%, 15%, and a top rate of 20%); however threshold amounts have increased: the maximum zero percent rate amounts are $40,000 for individuals and $80,000 for married filing jointly. For an individual taxpayer whose income is at or above $441,450 ($496,600 married filing jointly), the rate for both capital gains and dividends is capped at 20 percent. All other taxpayers fall into the 15 percent rate amount (i.e., above $40,000 and below $441,450 for single filers).

Estate and Gift Taxes

For an estate of any decedent during calendar year 2020, the basic exclusion amount is $11.58 million, indexed for inflation (up from $11.4 million in 2019). The maximum tax rate remains at 40 percent. The annual exclusion for gifts remains at $15,000.

Individuals - Tax Credits

Adoption Credit

In 2020, a non-refundable (only those individuals with tax liability will benefit) credit of up to $14,300 is available for qualified adoption expenses for each eligible child.

Earned Income Tax Credit

For tax year 2020, the maximum Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for low and moderate-income workers and working families rises to $6,660 up from $6,557 in 2019. The credit varies by family size, filing status, and other factors, with the maximum credit going to joint filers with three or more qualifying children.

Child Tax Credits

For tax years 2019 through 2025, the child tax credit is $2,000 per child. The refundable portion of the credit is $1,400 so that even if taxpayers do not owe any tax, they can still claim the credit. A $500 nonrefundable credit is also available for dependents who do not qualify for the Child Tax Credit (e.g., dependents age 17 and older).

Child and Dependent Care Credit

The Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit also remained under tax reform. If you pay someone to take care of your dependent (defined as being under the age of 13 at the end of the tax year or incapable of self-care) to work or look for work, you may qualify for a credit of up to $1,050 or 35 percent of $3,000 of eligible expenses in 2020. For two or more qualifying dependents, you can claim up to 35 percent of $6,000 (or $2,100) of eligible expenses. For higher-income earners, the credit percentage is reduced, but not below 20 percent, regardless of the amount of adjusted gross income. This tax credit is nonrefundable.

Individuals - Education

American Opportunity Tax Credit and Lifetime Learning Credits

The maximum credit is $2,500 per student for the American Opportunity Tax Credit. The Lifetime Learning Credit remains at $2,000 per return; however, the adjusted gross income amount used by joint filers to determine the reduction in the Lifetime Learning Credit is $118,000 ($59,000 single filers).

Interest on Educational Loans

In 2020, the maximum deduction for interest paid on student loans is $2,500. The deduction begins to be phased out for higher-income taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of more than $70,000 ($140,000 for joint filers) and is completely eliminated for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income of $85,000 ($170,000 joint filers).

Individuals - Retirement

Contribution Limits

The elective deferral (contribution) limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government's Thrift Savings Plan increases to $19,500 (up from $19,000 in 2019). Contribution limits for SIMPLE plans increase to $13,500 (up from $13,000 in 2019). The maximum compensation used to determine contributions increases to $285,000 (up from $280,000 in 2019).

Income Phase-out Ranges

The deduction for taxpayers making contributions to a traditional IRA is phased out for singles and heads of household who are covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan and have modified AGI between $65,000 and $75,000.

For married couples filing jointly, in which the spouse who makes the IRA contribution is covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan, the phase-out range increases to $104,000 to $124,000. For an IRA contributor who is not covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan and is married to someone who is covered, the deduction is phased out if the couple's modified AGI is between $196,000 and $206,000.

The modified AGI phase-out range for taxpayers making contributions to a Roth IRA is $124,000 to $139,000 for singles and heads of household, up from $122,000 to $137,000. For married couples filing jointly, the income phase-out range is $196,000 to $206,000, up from $193,000 to $203,000. The phase-out range for a married individual filing a separate return who makes contributions to a Roth IRA is not subject to an annual cost-of-living adjustment and remains $0 to $10,000.

Saver's Credit

In 2020, the AGI limit for the Saver's Credit (also known as the Retirement Savings Contribution Credit) for low and moderate income workers is $65,000 for married couples filing jointly, up from $64,000 in 2019; $48,750 for heads of household, up from $48,000; and $32,500 for singles and married individuals filing separately, up from $32,000 in 2019.

Any accounting or tax advice contained in this communication is not intended as a thorough, in-depth analysis of specific issues, nor a substitute for a formal opinion, nor is it sufficient to avoid tax-related penalties.

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